Monday, February 19, 2007

Omelette Moliere

Adapted from An Omelette and a Glass of Wine by Elizabeth David

So far I have not mentioned Elizabeth David - Elizabeth David who has given me many, many hours of pleasure - reading - cooking - eating. Her writing is scholarly and funny, pure rapture. Her recipes are clear, if not simple, and as bare bones as possible, never contrived. There is not one ingredient too many. It's her recipe for chocolate souffle that I use. She has been the inspiration for many cooks, Paula Wolfert and Laurie Colwin, to name just two. Imagine the ecstasy of spending an afternoon in France eating and drinking and talking with Elizabeth David and her friend Richard Olney. At least they left directions for us to follow in their footsteps. I prefer this omelette (Elizabeth David's spelling) for lunch or dinner rather than for breakfast with, as Ms. David says, a glass of wine.

The recipe actually calls for 3 eggs, but I don't know anyone, including me, who will eat 3 eggs at one time; however, you might want to make it with 3 eggs and then split it with someone for a very light lunch.

If you follow these directions and use beautiful fresh eggs and butter, you should end up with a soft bright golden roll plump and spilling out a little at the edges.


2 eggs
1 tablespoon parmigiano-reggiano
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon gruyère
1 tablespoon heavy cream

Beat 1 tablespoon of finely grated parmigiano-reggiano with 2 eggs. Heat the pan on the stove for about a minute. Put a tablespoon of butter in the pan. When the butter bubbles and is about to change color, pour in the eggs.

Add one tablespoon of gruyère cut into small dice and one tablespoon of heavy cream. Tilt the pan towards you so that some of the mixture from the far edge runs into the middle. Then tilt the pan away from you. In the time it takes to do this twice, the gruyère will have started to melt, and your omelette is ready. Fold it over in three with a fork, and slide it on to the plate. Serve instantly.

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